Tag Archives: Bushmanland

Aloidendron dichotomum (part 1 of 2)

Based on genetic research, in 2013 Ronell Klopper and Gideon Smith created the  genus Aloidendron to accommodate 6 species of tree aloes, including Aloe dichotoma. The plants form trees with a rounded crown,  with stems to 1 m in diameter … Continue reading

Posted in succulents | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Augea capensis

When one sees a great many of these plants together, this usually means that the  local vegetation has been heavily disturbed (the plants are rarely eaten by stock or game because the juice in the leaves is very salty). They can … Continue reading

Posted in succulents | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Crassula corallina (part 2: subsp. macrorrhiza)

Compared to ssp. corallina, these plants look more sturdy, with leaves 4-5 mm long and wide. The leaves are also much whiter. Another difference is that they have a tuberous main root up to 1.2 cm wide (macrorrhiza= with a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Euphorbia dregeana

As the first picture shows, these up to 2m tall, dense clumps are very conspicuous in the field. The branches are yellowish-green to grey-green, usually up to 3 cm thick at the base and 1.2 cm in diameter above, with leaves that soon disappear. … Continue reading

Posted in succulents | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Crassula columnaris (part 3 of 3)

And here some pictures of subsp. prolifera.

Posted in succulents | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Crassula columnaris (part 2 of 3)

More pictures of subsp. columnaris.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Crassula columnaris (part 1 of 3)

It takes plants of this species 5-10 years to reach maturity and become columnar. There are 2 subspecies, each with a number of local forms. The plants are often locally abundant on gentle slopes and in depressions (often with quartz gravel); sometimes they also … Continue reading

Posted in succulents | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment