Tag Archives: Asteraceae (Compositae)

Senecio crassissimus

Because of the peculiar orientation of its leaves, this species is often called Vertical Leaf Senecio or propeller plant. The plants have creeping to erect stems, to 80 cm tall  and much-branched. The vertically flattened leaves* are variable in shape, size … Continue reading

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Othonna protecta

As the name implies, this species is often hiding under other plants or between rocks. For that reason, it is not easy to make good pictures of it. The photographer usually must choose between showing either what the plant looks … Continue reading

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Othonna carnosa

Since its publication in 2000, “Cape plants” by J. Manning & P. Goldblattt   has been one of my main sources of information on plants of southwestern South Africa. In 2012 a new edition was published, with the somewhat unwieldy title “Plants of … Continue reading

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Othonna taraxacoides

Almost two years ago I published a post on Othonna auriculifolia. Today’s subject could be considered the northern counterpart of that species. Both were described in the first half of the 19th century, when taxonomy was still a very European … Continue reading

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Senecio cotyledonis (2)

  The companion plant in the last picture is Adromischus triflorus

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Senecio cotyledonis (1)

When the Swiss botanist  Augustin de Candolle described this species in 1838, he apparently saw a likeness to a Cotyledon. But when I ran through the mental pictures of Cotyledons that I know, I wondered what resemblance he could have had in … Continue reading

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Senecio (Kleinia) polytomus

Polytomus means something like much divided and refers to the fact that the plants are much more branched than in otherwise similar species like S. scottii and S. odora. In nature the plants form compact shrubs up to about a … Continue reading

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