Tag Archives: Asphodelaceae (Aloaceae)

Aloidendron dichotomum (part 1 of 2)

Based on genetic research, in 2013 Ronell Klopper and Gideon Smith created the  genus Aloidendron to accommodate 6 species of tree aloes, including Aloe dichotoma. The plants form trees with a rounded crown,  with stems to 1 m in diameter … Continue reading

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Aloe gariepensis

Both the scientific and the vernacular name (Orange River Aloe) refer to its occurrence along the Orange River (from Grootderm in the west to Keimoes in the east). It is also plentiful in the Warmbad area of Namibia. The plants … Continue reading

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Aloe ballyi

This very distinctive species normally produces one single stem up to 8 m tall and only 10-15 cm thick. Sometimes, plants branch from the base and form large shrubs. Each stem bears about 25 leaves, up to 90 cm long and grey-green on both … Continue reading

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Aloe striata ssp. striata

This is one of the very few southern African Aloes without spines on the edge of the leaves. The stems are rarely over 30 cm long and the leaves are up to 60 cm long and 15 cm wide, from greenish-grey … Continue reading

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Aloe peckii

In general, this species is stemless and growing singly or in small groups, but sometimes groups of over 20 rosettes are formed. Each rosette has 14-16 leaves, about 16 cm long and 6 cm wide at the base, usually olive-green with … Continue reading

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Aloe somaliensis

Aloe somaliensis was described in 1899, from plants that were raised at Kew from seeds that had been collected a few years before, probably at Sheikh pass in Somaliland Protectorate (as it was then called). It is now known to occur not … Continue reading

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Aloe microstigma (part 2 of 2)

The first two pictures show how the plants curve their leaves inwards as a protection against sun and wind in the dry season.    This picture  was taken late January, the next one mid March.

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